Monday, 25 March 2013

Pink feat. Nate Ruess- "Just give me a reason"

This duet is in for a treat! As all the followers of this blog already know, we always relish lyrics sung by Pink and FUN so that now their "Just give me a reason" proves one clearer evidence of our devotion to them!

Level: pre-intermediate

Grammar focus on: adjectives about feelings and quality

Activity: fill in the gaps (items provided)

Just give me a reason

Lyrics taken from: directlyrics

Video:

Linguistic aspects: A few words to exaplain the meaning of idioms. To start with, it is written in the stars is used to say it is certain to happen or it is meant to happen that....

Let's consider then  Your head is running wild again which sounds like  You are behaving like you want and no one can control you.

Besides we are collecting (or gathering) dust is an expression that compares ourselves to books, because as long as they remain unused, they are covered with dust. 

What's more, a very interesting idiomatic phrase is our hearts are not broken but just bent, which clearly defines the fact that after suffering so much, we are still in love with each other.

In conclusion, let's talk about two verbs (deriving from nouns): to duct and to rust. In the first case tears are ducted, i.e. they are conveyed through the eye tube. While your feelings can get rusted if they are damaged and you dont' feel like falling in love anymore.

Monday, 18 March 2013

Bastille- "Pompeii"

What are we up to today?A breath of fresh air is filling our lungs, thanks to "Pompeii". This is the latest hit released by the new British band, Bastille. Just out of curiosity, the band was named after the Bastille Day, i.e. the day Dan Smith (frontman and songwriter) was born.

Level: intermediate

Grammar focus on: vocabulary

Activity: word order, fill in the grid with words related to prepositions, -ing form, wh-questions and find opposites 

Pompeii

Lyrics taken from: www.azlyrics.com

Video: 


Linguistic aspects: a short guide today to highlight some aspects. 

First, I was left to my devices: here it is to say that I was alone and I was allowed to fool someone else.

Secondly, days fall away every time you realise that time goes by, but that is almost insignificant to you. You can also say that a poster can fall away, in case it breaks off from the thing it has been fixed to. Otherwise a piece of land falls aways when it slopes down. In a figurative way, if you examine that sales have fallen away recently, you get to the point that shops have sold less products lately. In addition to this, in literary British a sound (or feeling)   falls away as long as it becomes weaker (see Macmillan Dictionary for further information).

Thirdly, you reduce something to rubble anytime you destroy it completely. Literally, a rubble is any piece of broken stone.

In the end, the expression: "Let the dust settle" is an excellent tip to give whenever you suggest that a person needs to calm down, after a violent outburst or breakdown.

Sunday, 10 March 2013

Michael Bublé- "It's a Beautiful Day"

Who said that breaking up is only a painful experience? In "It's a Beautiful Day" Michael Bublé tells us how much relieved one can feel once his/her love story is eventually over, so happy listening to every "broken heart"!

Level: pre-intermediate

Grammar focus on: phrasal verbs

Activity: listening with fill in the gaps (prepositions)

It's a Beautiful Day

Lyrics taken from: Direct Lyrics

Video:


Tips for teachers:  as a warm-up activity, you can write down on the class board a list of synomys of the phrasal verbs presented by the song and ask your students to make predictions.

Linguistic aspects: this song describes personal feelings in a very detailed way. For instance, you hold your breath when you see something unexpected in front of you and you are taken by surprise but you have to control yourself

Futher, an other metaphor is used in saying that you tear the seam of someone's dream, i.e.  you want to destroy someone's desire. Let's examine the original meaning of the word: in origin a seam is a line where two pieces of fabric are sewn together but once it is removed,  the two pieces are no longer joined and that piece of fabric is inevitably torn. The noun is also used in the expression bursting/ bulging at the seams meaning a place full of people or objects.

Then you come up with a specific line or  you come up with the goods when you do exactly what you promised to do or what people expect you to do. Similarly you get/come/ fall into line with everytime you agree with or you adjust to a precise idea or concept.

If you cage someone you keep that person in prison. Here is an example of a  verb deriving from a noun: the cage is a container made of wire or metal bars  used for  birds. In colloquial language a caged bird is someone imprisoned.

As for the statements used to introduce an evidence, you can say: "There's no denying that..." when you want to say that "it is clear that../ there is no doubt that/ it goes without saying that...".

Finally,  after breaking up with someone you can feel refreshed again if you take up or start a new hobby, like going to the gym, a new habit, like going to the cinema, or a new job.